Welcome to the Mortgage Hub

This is your guide to homeownership. The resources here will lead you through everything you need to obtain the right loan.

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Find the Loan for You

Do any of these statements sound familiar? We have the loan for you.

I want to buy a home, but don't have enough money for a down payment
FHA Loan Click to Learn More
I am veteran, but don't have any money for a down payment.
VA Loan Click to Learn More
The home I want costs more than $417,000. Can I still get a loan?
Jumbo Click to Learn More
I have 20% for a down payment, but the funds were gifted to me.
Conventional, FHA, VA, Click to Learn More
I want to buy a home, but don't want to pay mortgage insurance.
VA, FHA, Conventional Click to Learn More
I have 20% for a down payment but don't have two years of work experience.
Conventional Click to Learn More
I have been self-employed for 5 years, can I get a loan?
Conventional Click to Learn More
I was foreclosed on and want to buy a home again.
FHA, Conventional Click to Learn More
I want to buy a home, but I just graduated from college and don't have two years work experience.
FHA, Conventional Click to Learn More
About half of my income comes from disability checks from the government. Can I still get a home loan?
FHA, VA, Jumbo, Conventional Click to Learn More
I am a non-permenant resident alien with a work visa. Can I get a mortgage?
Conventional, FHA, Jumbo Click to Learn More
I want to buy a fixer-upper and need a loan for the improvements.
203K Click to Learn More

See What You Can Afford

Monthly Payment*

$870

Total Mortgage Cost*

$313,349

*View calculation assumptions and disclosure.

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Our Customers Say It Best

"I like the reverse mortgage because I can put money into my line of credit and it grows for me tax-free. I like the fact that I don’t have to make monthly payments, unless I want to."

Caroline

Fresno, CA

"I’d like to thank you once again for the excellent way in which you helped me achieve my financial goals by making my reverse mortgage a reality. Your keen understanding of the products available, a most thorough knowledge of the reverse mortgage process, along with your easygoing nature made taking all the necessary steps a pleasure rather than an ordeal."

Tim M

San Diego, CA

"I was extremely impressed with the level of customer service, attentiveness, timeliness and accuracy. I proceeded to do two additional home refi’s through Land Home Financial, and I must say, I was not disappointed! I am very happy with Land Home Financial, and wouldn’t hesitate to recommend them to a friend or family member!"

Sara

California

FAQ

When Should I Get a 15-Year Fixed Loan?

Fifteen-year loans became quite popular in the 90′s. Thanks to historically low rates, borrowers can use a 15-year loan to pay off their ... Read More.

Fifteen-year loans became quite popular in the 90′s. Thanks to historically low rates, borrowers can use a 15-year loan to pay off their home loans quickly without an unbearably high mortgage payment.

The benefits are simple: You could own your house free and clear more quickly and you might save a great deal of interest. For example, a couple in their mid-40s may like this concept knowing that by the time they reach age 60, they own their home and will no longer have mortgage payments. For a young couple in the mid-20s, it may not make as much sense as having a longer term 30-year loan.

The key to deciding is to compare the monthly payments and see how comfortable you are with the higher payments of a 15-year loan. If you want to pay off your loan early but can’t quite handle the payments on a 15-year loan, ask us about our 20-year loans. For those who want to pay off their loan even more quickly, we can offer a 10-year fully amortizing loan.

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When Should I Get a 30-Year Fixed Loan?

The traditional 30-year fixed rate mortgage has a constant interest rate with the monthly payments (principal and interest only) that nev... Read More.

The traditional 30-year fixed rate mortgage has a constant interest rate with the monthly payments (principal and interest only) that never change for both conforming and jumbo loan programs. This may be a good choice if you plan to stay in your home for seven years or longer. If you plan to move within seven years, adjustable-rate loans are usually more cost effective.

As a rule of thumb, fixed-rate loans may be harder to qualify for than adjustable-rate loans. When interest rates are low, fixed-rate loans are generally not that much more expensive than adjustable-rate mortgages and may be a better deal in the long run because you can lock in the rate for the life of your loan.

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What Are Adjustable-Rate Mortgage Programs?

Adjustable-rate mortgage programs charge a fixed-interest rate for the first three, five, seven, or ten years. After that time, the loan ... Read More.

Adjustable-rate mortgage programs charge a fixed-interest rate for the first three, five, seven, or ten years. After that time, the loan turns into a variable interest rate loan (with a rate cap) for the remaining years on the life of the loan, based on the then-current interest rates.

When it comes to Adjustable-Rate Mortgages (ARMs), there is a basic rule to remember: The longer you ask the lender to charge a specific rate, the more expensive the loan.

If you plan to own the house for three years or less, the perfect loan is one that is fixed for three years before starting to adjust. This way you’ll benefit from the lower rate offered by an ARM without being subjected to the uncertainty of payments that could be higher. Similarly, if you think you’ll be in the house for five or fewer years, the perfect loan is our loan that is fixed for five years before starting to adjust. The same logic applies to our loan that is fixed for seven years before adjusting.

Read Less Still have questions? Ask Us.
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Glossary


Amortization
Loan payment of equal periodic payments calculated to pay off the debt, as well as the accrued interest on the outstanding balance, at the end of a fixed period.

Assumption
Agreement between buyer and seller, where the buyer takes over (assumes) the payments on an existing mortgage from the seller. Assuming a loan usually saves the buyer money because an existing mortgage debt does not require closing costs or new, potentially higher, market-rate interest charges.

Balloon (Payment) Mortgage
Usually a short-term, fixed-rate loan that involves small payments for a determined period of time and one large payment for the remaining amount of the principal at a time specified in the contract.
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